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of our schools. they're not military encampments. they're safe environments in which the children feel very secure around with that kind of protection. you think about, in your country, england has an armed presence for international flights going in and out of england in a very sensitive environment called an airplane. post-9/11, people said guns have no place in the cockpit or in the passenger planes. but in fact, they have worked very well because they're trained. >> actually, let me pick you up on that. it has works effectively. what's been effective on planes is an outright ban on any weapons, any guns. that's what's been effective. the reason you dont see people using guns on planes is they have been banned. this brings me to the point of what i have been trying to get to on this show, which is it's not about removing everybody's guns in america. it's a complete fallacy when people spin out that line. it's designed, i think, to instill the kind of fear president obama talked about today. trying to make people think, oh, my god, they're coming for my gun. and what happens is a lot
't help them along. they have been squeezed because of a tough environment. there is a big move into tablets and smartphones and all the competition weighs on intel, this type of company. talk about analyst calls. credit suisse cut the target. piper jaffray raised their target just to name a few. but they do have outperforms and neutrals. outperform came from credit suisse. back to you. melissa: nicole, thanks so much. ashley: washington, d.c. prepping for inauguration weekend. if you want a ultimate experience and don't we all, it will cost you a king's ransom. details are ahead. melissa: playing chicken with the energy industry literally. a new fight to shut down oil and wind production to save the prairie chicken. it is a chicken fight. ♪ . melissa: so is the prairie chicken versus the wind farm. the environmental battle heating up as the fish and wildlife service contemplates adding the bird to endangered species list. if that means shutting down vital wind farms and oil and gas facilities is it worth it. i understand the main problem is that these prairie chickens are afr
there in helping the schools provide a more secure environment and in terms of what's been provided to congress on the gun control side, all i can say, that's not going to help keep our children safer and i want to look for solutions in the schools to have better technology, have the better architecture, have the armed trained presence there, to really protect the children and keep our parents having confidence in our schools. >> sean: they keep saying gun-free school zones. is that the answer? >> well, that's actually -- no, it's not the answer in terms -- of course, you could have an armed trained law enforcement person there, even in a gun-free zone. so, that does not necessarily be inconsistent. but in some parts of the country there's not enough resources for a sworn officer there, so the question is, are we going to have other trained school officials there that are trained, properly trained, but can have a response capability to an armed intruder? right now, that would violate many of the state laws on gun-free zones. and so, you're going to have to look at legal changes to accomplish th
was fantastic. this is all about creating an environment where businesses can grow, especially led by manufacturing, and we're going to be exporting the explorer from chicago because of what we've done to improve our competitors in the united states to 94 countries around the world so there's no reason that we can't do this in the united states if we have a laser focus on creating an environment where businesses can grow. liz: good news. as you look over the right shoulder at the sparkly grill, that atlas is something. you know, i look at concept cars, though, alan, as a unicorn. you see them once at auto shows, and then they never really materialize on dealership floors. will we see that car behind you? that truck in some form at dealerships in the future? >> yes, and to your point, liz, the neatest thing over the last six years, we, on every concept car we have had, we wanted to communicate where that design, where that capability was going and where we were taking it so there are concept cars, but they have a clear indication of where we are going to be improving the vehicle. to
that could be said. that being said, stocks that go to 90 will go to 120. a very bullish environment if we do sell off, i want you to buy, not sell. always a bull market somewhere, right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer. i will see you tomorrow. >>> >>> good evening, i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." yes, the stock market still bullish. i think that's great. i'm a bull too right now. but here's my challenge to everyone. instead of just a 2% economy, why can't we do so much better and get to a 4 or 5% growth economy? president obama has still not adopted progrowth policy. here's another thing. i'm not the only one who wants the president and congress to significantly cut spending. i mean, significantly. it would be progrowth and no more tax hikes by the way. spending and the debt are the top issue of concern for voters. look, these heinous mass murders are not about weapons. question -- why isn't anyone tackling the really tough issue that may be the root causes of these atrocities? such as broken families, such as the absence of fathers who set examples for their sons? such as
in tune politically whether it's for the environment or for good health, whatever, is that part of conscious capitalism you make a decision not to just go for the dollar? >> actually, conscious capitalism rejects the premise behind that question. >> greta: okay. >> the premise is there's trade-offs and you have to negotiate between the trade-offs, if you're doing something for the environment it must come at the expense of the investors. good conscious leadership is to define win, win, win strategies so all of these stake holders simultaneously winning, that's sometimes not easy requires imagination and creativity. >> greta: taxes and have you thought about our corporate tax rate? >> could have,we have the highest corporate tax rate in the entire world now. japan used to be number one and u.s. number two. they cut their rates and now when you combine state and federal taxes, the highest corporate tax rates in the world. >> greta: how does that affect your business? you're very successful, you're a rich man and how does it affect you and your employees. >> every dollar we pay in
, deficits, gun control, immigration. a lot to do and not a great environment to get it done. but with us now, two men who may not have to worry too much about that, but who may give us great insights if possible to get great things done. barney frank, the former democratic congressman from massachusetts and steve latourette, republican from ohio. first to you, congressman, as the democrat, what does the president have to do differently in the second term to have a more cooperative, working environment. to you, sir, what does the republican party need to do to try to get some things done? >> i have to differ with the preface, john. >> i thought you might. >> barack obama -- look, this notion that partisanship has taken over. it began when barack obama became president. i was chairman of the financial service committee of 2007 in the bush administration and i worked very closely with hank paulson, secretary of the treasury. we worked on putting fannie mae and freddie mac to stop the lawsuits. george bush went to harry reid and nancy pelosi in december of 2007. he said the economy is slipping,
the feds for smaller buy back to go forward to play it safe in a regulatory environment. sue, back to you. >> thank you very much. matt, covering goldman sachs and j.p. morgan for wells fargo. matt, first of all, let's go to j.p. morgan. how do you rate the stock and do today's rates change the way you feel about the stock? >> thanks, sue. we have an outperform rating on j.p. morgan today and we've had it for some time. we think today's results actually were, once you read through a number of the one-time items, relatively strong. we see a core return on tangible common equity in mid teens. and we think that the strong mortgage performance of the company as well as the relatively strong performance out of investment bank, good revenue performance, and as your previous reporter mentioned, preconference as well and that leads it a solid performance. relative to the peer group for the next six to 12 months. >> so matt, give mae choice between goldman sachs and j.p. morgan. i know they have fundamental differences between them, but if you have to buy one stock today, would it be j.p. morgan o
in the selective environment is they want to have enough fire power to fight police and military forces. >> frank smyth thank you for joining me tonight. some more unmasking of the nr are a is next. tom sellek has been with the nra for years. is he a man of courage or does he just play one on tv? husband. loving father to your children. but first you've got to get him to say, "hello." new crest 3d white arctic fresh toothpaste. use it with these 3d white products, and whiten your teeth in just 2 days. what will a 3d white smile do for you? new crest 3d white toothpaste. life opens up when you do. you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> as we reported earlier tom sel selleck is the subject of tonight's editorial. kudos
above normal. and that's a huge increase in temperature in the marine environment. >> reporter: how could you characterize the shrimp stocks off the coast of maine today? >> in critical condition. >> reporter: critical? >> critical condition. >> reporter: patrick kelleher is the commissioner of the maine department of marine resources. it's his job to protect the fishery. so he and a committee took the step of limiting the shrimp catch to less than one and a half million pounds-- down 72% from last year. >> it takes a while for this population to catch back up. it's not a rosy picture at all. it's very difficult. very difficult for the managers, but it's a hell of a lot more difficult for the fishermen. >> reporter: the 300 shrimp traps that cost ronald pinkham $85 apiece may never make it out of his backyard this year. so if you're not out shrimping that's a couple people without work. >> three or four people without work. so it kind of snowballs down the line. with the restrictions on shrimping it may be that the only thing pinkham and colby catch this winter is a beautiful sunris
. the green crab decimated fisheries and altered the local environment here. >> reporter: in the mississippi river, asian carp wipe out native fish. in the great lakes, zebra mussels are the problem. today, the challenge, contain invasive species before they get out of control. >> this problem is extremely serious and can cause environmental harm, economic harm, and harm even to human health. we're talking about over $100 billion worth of damage to the u.s. economy every year. >> reporter: for now, it's unclear what, if any damage, will occur in the pacific northwest. but tonight the experts don't like what they see. miguel almaguer, nbc news, san francisco. >>> when we come back, a big birthday for the first lady, though not the big one. and she celebrates with a new look. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. a body at rest t
that there's a message of getting money from this environment and things going out of control, beyond her state's ability to deal with it. >> usually, of course, this is a classic problem that the insurance company has to deal with. they damaged the offender and they want a new car. but they have a profit and discipline of bad behavior. >> so to that point, whether we were police or qwest or not, making sure that congress does not do that. what do you think? >> hinkley hefty set up a process in advance. this is a classic case. we are under the heat of battle, there are bad stories and it's tough for congress to discipline itself. >> you're just trying to make sure that the money isn't wasted. but you will grow. >> well, you do. and you have to have a profit. >> the kind of control, you know it, the residents in your state are going to get this money because it's going to bypass you to get a roof or to put a new roof on the smithsonian. >> you know, absolutely. there are profits in place. billions of dollars going on immediately. and it's really then it's really about making sure that were
don't know. you can't ignore the complex interplay between biology and environment when it comes to this illness. >> what about the ethnic factor? we always talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it lack of tolerance? what's the terms? is there a term for it? is there legacy? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and there's an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, preen. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it with the use of experimentation of marijuana, drugs, you're -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana. >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to be -- weigh in here because we already know what the liquor industry and the tobacco industry have done to our country in targeting kids. and so we need to be mindful and not rush into this -- >> like joe camel, that kind of stuff. >> exactly. joe camel. liquor stores are in places where you know that there are people who are going to abuse liquor and
of statistics and the economic environment that we're in today? >> now, i wish i had an answer to that one. you know, i've said before that there is a highway into poverty today, and there's not even a sidewalk out. and there's very little, once you get there, and you are so there, that can be done to help you at this point in time. because there aren't the jobs, there aren't the resources, there aren't the credit limits that there used to be. so the real key here is, what can you do out there right now to prevent yourself from going into poverty? and i always say that there are three things. three things that if we could just learn to ask ourselves, before we spend a penny. number one, is it a need or a want? obviously, if it's a need, you have to buy it. if it's a want, can you just walk away? you have to get as much pleasure in saving as you do spending. this era of spending, spending, spending has got to go. and last but not least, we all have to get as much pleasu in saving as we do spending. so, you know, it's very interesting. >> suze, what if you're one of those people who's unemployed.
cliff was a friendly family discussion compared to this hatfield/mccoy environment that's unfolding with regard to spending. >> so you think this whole story is going to have some real heart-stopping moments for the markets? >> i think there will be huge consequences. recall that in the summer of 2011 the last time we faced this that the dow went down 1800 points in july and august. now, granted there were some other issues in europe that were a concern. but we could see some serious consequences as a result of these -- this inability to have a discussion on spending cuts. >> i know you're a bond specialist, but apple reducing their iphone orders and so forth. apple fell 3.5% today. $18 to 501. is this apple reduction in ipad orders, is this symbolic of an economy that's getting weaker? >> well, i think so. i think -- well, we have heard some people say that, yes, it's part apple. the company. but also, i think it is symbolic of just people not having enough certainty of what kind of money they will have in the future to spend on items such as what apple offers. >> at the same time,
provide a better safety environment for our kirn. >> now, rooiyan, it seems like e republ lip cans, and i noticed the congressman said we don't need them all, some republicans do sound like they are more open to possible gun legislation more than some of the far right. listen to this. >> should we look at improving our background check system? i'm willing to listen to what proposals come forward on that is this. >> there are some problems. and maybe these huge magazines even for someone who says, look, i just use an ar-15 for target practice. but do you really need to be shooting a silhouette? a shot a second or even quicker with that weapon? for what purpose? >> now, when you see a guy who, by the way last week was defending todd aiken, and when he's talking about do you really need a lot of the magazines that have the ability to shoot a lot of rounds, i mean, you're starting to see some cracks in the armor of the far right extremists here. >> right. i mean, you just simply do not need that. about that's the problem that these -- that these gun rights advocates have. when he asked that q
labor, but for the environment, green jobs, women's rights. >> thank you. >> the lot. hilda, what about immigration reform and what it would mean to the treasury. how many more americans, how many more people would we get on the rolls on paying taxes in this country if it were done properly? >> well, if people were thinking rationally, we would look at putting money back into our treasury and the social security fund, in the medicare and medicaid fund, because people would be brought out of the shadows. you're talking about billions of dollars. in fact, what the president has done right now by allowing individuals from deferred action, the dreamers, to be able to be a part of our system here, they're going to be contributors. they're going to have a work permit. they're going to be able to contribute to us that money will go into our treasury. they will be abiding citizens, citizens, potential citizens. but more importantly what will happen for those many 12 million and others. they're not all latino, by the way. they come from different countries. >> yeah. >> so let's talk than. let's
&p are yielding more than the ten-year u.s. treasury, and that type of environment where dividends are going to grow 10% this year, that can be a good backdrop on stocks like ford that developed its dividend last week, lowe's on the home improvement side and dresser injuries and transindustries. >> with all due respect, jpmorgan out yesterday saying that maybe the dividend play is last year's play and maybe now is the time to get into riskier assets in equities because they feel like the economy is going to start to pick up. so you're sticking with the dividend play though? >> i am. for these two reasons. one, bill, the growth of dividends is the story. not the absolute yield. it's the growth in dividends and that can be names like qualcomm, apple, ford is my example. second. when investors look much like 1994 and 1999, when interest rates went higher, the ten-year treasury was yielding, was returning minus 3% for those two calendar years. people will come back to the stock market, but they will come back to the stock market in the safer yield and dividend-growing stories. that is why i thin
environment go away. >> mike: all right. travis, what happens to your business in this coming year? >> we had two huge rollouts and the left-handed model for chord buddy, 20% of people are left-handed and the classical model it's not going to happen. we will not get the breaks that are need today write off that money tax-wise, it's not there anymore. >> mike: new product means you've got to manufacture more, means somebody's got to build it, somebody's got to ship it, somebody's got to sell it, so it's several jobs down the line, that won't happen because you don't have the money to make that work. >> right. >> and john, you talked about may be fewer folks out on the road with you. >> yeah. >> mike: what happens to those people, where do they go? what can they do? >> it's that effect of people losing jobs. and i mean, it's a painful thing to let somebody go that you've been working with for years and years and especially in music and what i do. that's part of what you do and part of your sound, but at the end of the day looking at your papers and your numbers and i'm not going to run a busine
rate environment is very tough for them. you want to be cautious going into earnings. sandra: i told everybody you would be naming names. stock your portfolios with what you suggest here. you're calling for three of the 11 regional names to beat expectations. which three? >> well that would be mtb u.s. bank and fifth third and we think they are all in a position because of their mix of earnings, a lot of fee income because of merger in the case of mtb. those are ones where you could see them buck this trend of overall pressure on earnings. we think those are the places to be and they're high quality names. sandra: i want to tell everybody, m & t reporting this week on wednesday, fifth third is reporting on thursday. those are where you're calling for beats. six of them you are predicting of regional banks will miss expectations which six? >> we have a number of them. in fact it will be more than six. it will be across the board. we look at a keycorp and pnc, some of the other names where the net interest margin pressure because of a flat curve, much like wells fargo, even if they mak
deficits, and also to deal with our trade deficits, and create an environment where the businesses can grow in the united states. the most important thing is we come together with a comprehensive solution, not just working one piece or the other, but a comprehensive solution where we can start to grow the economy again for everybody. >> but the order in which we do things matters. first, raise the debt ceiling, allowing america to pay for its bills that it already racked up. then come up with a longer term plan that could put us back in fiscal good health. america's ability to meet its obligations should not be held hostage to an agreement on spending cuts. >>> retail sales went up by half a percentage in december. cars saw the biggest gain, jumping 1.8% at dealerships. other stores that see sales go up during the holiday season, like clothing and electronics, barely saw gains. while sales are expected to increase in 2013, it is slow going for now. for one thing, americans are getting a little less in their paycheck, now that the payroll tax holiday has ended. and a little less money means
restored with great care and attention to welcome students back into a peaceful and safe environment. many businesses and groups are promoting the love we have in newtown as well as fund-raising to help those in most need. neighbors here and elsewhere are reaching out to each other to provide support, services, listening ear, a shoulder to cry on. i've had the honor to meet people from similar events in aurora, columbine, and virginia tech, and hope they can teach us ways to help heal our families and town. i do not want to be someone sharing my experience and consoling another parent next time. i do not want there to be a next time. the sandy hook promises the start of our change, it is a promise we make for our community, but we need a nation of communities to join us in making and delivering on these promises if we are going to achieve true transformation. i don't know yet what these changes are, i come with no preconceived agenda. i do believe there is no quick fix single action, but instead a multitude of interlinked actions that are needed. i love newtown and i love sandy hook. my fa
, honoring the nation's veterans, the environment, and another one is economic development. randi? >> shannon travis, thank you very much for the update from there. and now some news outside the beltway. notre dame linebacker manti t'eo spoke to espn last night. it's his first interviewer since he was swept up in the controversy over a fake online girlfriend. now in that interviewer, he denied having any part in the fake girlfriend story except being the victim of a cruel hoax. te'o spoke with espn off camera about the whole ordeal. >> i could say that in the entire 2 1/2 hours we spoke, he was completely composed, self-assured. he betrayed no nervousness. he had maybe full command of the story suggests that it's a story rather than the truth. but he -- he had a full command of everything that i posed. >> and of course te'o told a man that -- a man named ronaiah tuiasosopo admitted to being behind the hoax. he showed them a tweet supposedly an apology from ronaiah tuiasosopo. cnn hasn't confirmed the tweet or the man's involvement. we went to his home actually in california, but the person th
environment that we're creating for ourselves and for our families. and this underlying culture of violence that leads to the kinds of tragedies that took place in newtown but also in columbine and aurora, and we can go through the list. we've almost become numb to the ticker telling us that some other community is confronting this kind of tragedy. and i think we have a responsibility as individuals and as citizens to push back on this. if this isn't the kind of culture we want, then we're going to have to say to companies, to our policymakers, this isn't -- you're going to have to stop. >> joe, i'm talking about playing nice, but i don't think that's going to work. >> and you know, the thing is, we have been focusing, of course, some on the gun lobby. >> right. >> but right after newtown, we were also talking about the responsibility of hollywood. >> right. >> and you want to talk about an industry that is completely blind to the -- you know, to their responsibility, bringing violence to culture, who was one of the most celebrated men sunday night at "the golden globes"? quentin tarantino.
returns, what you're telling clients for the next three to five years? >> in this environment, we're actually asking our clients to think about three things. first we're going to have low interest rates for awhile. so they need to adjust their expected returns. so in a low interest rate environment we're going to have lower returns across all asset classes. second, we're telling our clients that as they think about the lower returns in the context of their portfolios, they also need to recognize that we are going to have volatility from incremental policy on a global basis. whether it's in the u.s., europe, japan or emerging market countries. we are expecting that policy, whether it's monetary policy adjustments, fiscal policy, it will all be incremental. and that will create market pressure because it won't be at a pace that the markets would like to see. so that will introduce volatility. and it's not something our clients should try to trace. they should look over the horizon and invest for the long run. >> looking at the long run, three to five-year term outlook if you look at
but the politicians in washington who created this hostile environment. rather than talking gun education they are touting guns are bad and the people that own them are bad people. stuart: when you were outed as someone who is bad because you got a gun. >> i am not a sexual predator, not a felon but i am on this list like a felon or sexual predator would be on and you have to be extra cautious. coming back to gun laws the national debate washington about background checks, westchester county a pistol permit, 60 day waiting period co. a written tests, take classes, i did everything. these are the most responsible gun owners in the country and it was locked up because those guys are responsible gun owners who couldn't get to the gun. stuart: always a pleasure. you come back and see us and see how this plays out. thank you. the highlight reel is next. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 you should've seen me today. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 when the spx crossed above its 50-day moving average, tdd# 1-800-345-2550 i saw the trend. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 it looked really strong. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 and i jumped right
is going to keep giving or taking. the environment we live in is still conducive to be la tij jous because no one can make any money. carl, back to you. >> rick, we'll talk to you in a bit. rick santelli. >>> goldman is making waves with its bonus payouts. mary thompson has a flash. >> the company confirming that goldman has decided not to delay the bonus payments until april which would have allowed the bonuses to be taxed at a lower rate. goldman sachs' stock is slightly higher, about three-quarters of a percent. those payments originally due here in the u.s. in 2013 but the company, again, accelerated those payments into 2012 to take advantage of lower tax rates. again, the uk says -- someone close to the company saying that after some consideration, it will not be delaying bonus payments there to take advantage of lower rates. back to you. >> yeah, not the only bank where compensation is in the news. thank you, mary. >>> a few minutes left in europe's trading days. simon hobbs in less than 60 seconds. and i jumped right on it. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 tdd# 1-800-345-2550 since i've switched
proportionally because it was a real working-class environment which i grew up. so you didn't have mounds of food on your plate. and there were no snacks in our house. we didn't have potato chips or cookies. my mother would bake cookies once a week and then you'd have them as a treat. it was a whole different eating plan even though we were knocking back cokes all day long. >> with all due respect, i've heard this from joe, that's great that you ran all day. wonderful. that about the kids over the past 10, 20, 30 years who drank five cokes a day and didn't do that. >> is that coke's fault? that's the question. >> actually, it's part of a bigger problem just like the gun debate, okay? >> look, i have friends at coca-cola and friends at most of the soft drink companies. i think you've got to give them credit for at least putting this out there and saying obesity is an issue in america, and calories do count, and we're now talking about it as a result of them doing that. and it probably will generate some kind of a dialogue. >> i'll give them credit skeptically because i think they're covering thems
in the environment in which they are in. going to be really good show tonight. >> interesting. >> 8:00 p.m. on the fox news channel. governor, thank you. coming up on the show. a big automaker recalling hundreds of thousands of cars this morning because air bags may not work. the details you need to know about next. >> tucker: manti te'o culture to blame for destroying personal relationships and should online dating be avoided all together? is it actual dating if you don't meet the person you are dating? how weird is that? a fair and balanced debate coming up. look what mommy is having. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> alisyn: we told you notre dame
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)